Jake Sullivan, architect of the Iran Deal, National Security Adviser to Biden, and key Clinton aide, on Trump’s withdrawal from the agreement, North Korea, and what happened in 2016.

Jake Sullivan, second from left, with Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama.

Jake Sullivan has a C.V. which sounds like it’s been made up. A product of the local Minnesotan high school, (his phone number still begins with the Minneapolis calling code), Sullivan then went to Yale, won a Rhodes Scholarship to Oxford, was ranked the second best university debater in the world, returned to Yale Law… Continue Reading ➤

Brazilian Elections 2018: A short introduction to recent events

President Michel Temer with Justice Minister Alexandre de Moraes. Photo: Beto Barata /PR

This October Brazilians will go to the polls to elect the country’s future President, Vice President, National Congress, state Governors, and state Legislative Assemblies. With a population of over 200 million, the largest economy in Latin America, an intricate federal system, and the contemporary repercussions of colonialism and dictatorship, Brazilian politics is a labyrinth at… Continue Reading ➤

The Ghost of Jim Crow

Left: the March to Washington, 1963. Right: an ACLU voting rights protest (Source: aclu.org)

As with so much of America’s politics, the issue of voting rights cannot be disentangled from that of race. Black and other minority communities are still at the forefront of the voting rights struggle. Indeed, it is arguable that the best testimony to the importance and fragility of voting rights in the United States, is… Continue Reading ➤

The Importance of Memory in Shaping East Asian Relations

The Memorial to the Nanjing Massacre, Nanjing, China. Photo: Cornelius Kibelka via Flickr.

Criticising the realist lens of analysis in IR seems akin to beating a dead horse. Many theorists of international relations (IR) have given countless reasons that a purely realist lens of analysis is flawed. Yet although they reject political realism in the abstract, many theorists will return to it when analysing countries that are less… Continue Reading ➤

Putin Crafts Spectacle for Re-election Landslide

Source: Wikimedia commons

It is election day in Russia and the country’s incumbent president, Vladimir Putin, has his victory in the bag. The impending 2018-2024 term is expected to be Putin’s fourth in power, since the former KGB agent, once deputy mayor of St. Petersburg, relieved a widely unpopular Boris Yeltsin of the presidential sceptre in 2000. Nevertheless,… Continue Reading ➤

FEMEN’s Inna Shevchenko: We took our bodies and made them into instruments of feminism

Source: Wikimedia Commons

Tucked away in plain sight just walking distance from Saint-Germain-des-Prés stands the cosy, mahogany-kissed Café Bonaparte. Just like its immediate vicinity – once the nucleus of French intellectual thought, frequented regularly by the likes of Jean-Paul Sartre, Simone de Beauvoir, Ernest Hemingway, and, in distant, former times, grand Encyclopédistes such as Voltaire – the café… Continue Reading ➤

Have we finally run out of luck?

Source: Jerry Cummins

Human existence is frustratingly and sometimes terrifyingly arbitrary. Society seems to change chaotically. Nature throws us major curve balls all-too-often, with tsunamis, floods and earthquakes causing utter devastation and loss of life with little or no warning. The world can be a scarily unpredictable place, and for many people, the point of politics is to… Continue Reading ➤

Germany’s Dilemma: The Disastrous 2017 Election & Its Consequences

Merkel in 2017. Photo: EU2017EE via Flickr.

Four months after the 2017 federal election, when Germany finally formed a government through a coalition of Angela Merkel’s conservative CDU and Martin Schulz’s SPD, the nation breathed a sigh of relief. The election season had been gruelling. But despite the resolution of its electoral crisis, Germany, once seen as the ever-constant giant holding together… Continue Reading ➤