BBC Russian’s Seva Novgorodsev: my method was compassion

Seva Novgorodsev: "I was told on numerous occasions that I was the one who brought [the Soviet Union] down".

“I suppose it started in 1956 with ‘Rock around the Clock’,” says Seva Novogorodsev MBE, chuckling in a bout of reminiscence. The 74-year-old BBC Russian presenter sits across from me in a studio at BBC New Broadcasting House in London. It is the day of our interview for The Cambridge Globalist and I am, expectedly, overcome by emotion. What an honour it is… Continue Reading ➤

What next for Nigeria?

The Marina on Lagos Island in Nigeria's capital: the developed façade of a society undergoing profound change

Radios across Lagos, Nigeria’s most populous city with a staggering 21 million people, are alive with fiery political debate, catchy political jingles and celebrity endorsements. Election fever has hit the city, and the entire country; albeit over a longer period than first imagined. The election was actually due to take place under the auspices of… Continue Reading ➤

Fourth past the post: what 2015 could mean for electoral reform

Credit: Ben Waters

With the general election now six weeks away, the political landscape of the United Kingdom could hardly seem more fractured. Divided between the establishment parties and the surging forces of UKIP, Green and SNP, it is seeming increasingly unlikely that the electorate will provide a clear winner on May 7th. This chaotic state of affairs… Continue Reading ➤

How John Key could win the election for David Cameron

The "smiling assassin" John Key meets then US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton

Last month, buried deep in The Times (page eight or so), was a statement of audacious significance concerning a comparatively insignificant leader. Journalist Tim Montgomerie, covering a meeting between Prime Minister David Cameron and the Prime Minister of New Zealand, John Key, claimed that Key was the conservative leader who “is arguably Mr Cameron’s closest… Continue Reading ➤

The Politics of the Politics of European Austerity

German Chancellor Angela Merkel and European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker in May 2014. Has the advent of the latter's European investment plan indicated a shift in the balance of power in Europe away from German austerity?

The situation in Greece is at breaking point. Local councils have no money and Orthodox churches are having to feed people that authorities cannot cope with. Meanwhile in Athens, the newly elected Syriza party are in a standoff with the European Central Bank as they try to restructure their debt. They promised Greek voters they would… Continue Reading ➤

What’s Wrong with the Left in Europe?

The Occupy London march on 1st May 2012 to mark International Workers' Day

It comes to something when an article on the left in Europe must start with the success of the far-right, once again, in this tumultuous continent. The dust from the three days of terror in Paris, in which gunmen killed 17 people across the French capital, has barely settled on an uneasy and increasingly polarised… Continue Reading ➤

Days of Dawn and Torment: Iran’s slow revolution

The President of Iran Hassan Rouhani at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, in January 2014

“The Ten Days of Dawn” or “Daheh-ye Fajr” is a phrase used throughout Iran to describe and celebrate the brief period between Ayatollah Khomeini’s return to Iran and the official date of the 1979 Islamic Revolution. Some Iranians, however, have referred to the period as “Daheh-ye Zajr” or “The Ten Days of Torment”.  Two phrases that… Continue Reading ➤

Lone-operator Terrorism: Tackling a Growing Threat

terrorism, Breivik

For 17 years, the USA lived in fear of the “Unabomber”, Theodore Kacynski, who sent package bombs to unsuspecting victims. Over the course of these 17 years, the FBI acquired and analysed 82 million records, 9,000 event photographs and 12,000 event documents, but was unable to bring Kacynski to justice. It was eventually his brother… Continue Reading ➤

Vote for Me! Nigel Farage’s Predilection for Personality over Policy

Final Farage

Hidden among the festivities in the run-up to Christmas was Rozanne Duncan’s expulsion from the United Kingdom Independence Party. Cause for cheer should not be in short supply. The dismissal of the Thanet District Council member came in the wake of highly racist comments caught by a BBC exposé which is due to be aired… Continue Reading ➤

The Rise of the European Left: Syriza and Podemos

A riot policeman during May Day protests in Athens, 2010 (Source: Flickr: Joanna)

Today, the European Union is confronted with a problem that has raised the spectre of an existential crisis. Its failure to counter the 2008 financial crisis has led to economic and social devastation throughout Europe, and with it, a surge in anti-EU sentiment for its harsh doctrine of seemingly endless spending cuts. People are quickly… Continue Reading ➤