How John Key could win the election for David Cameron

The "smiling assassin" John Key meets then US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton

Last month, buried deep in The Times (page eight or so), was a statement of audacious significance concerning a comparatively insignificant leader. Journalist Tim Montgomerie, covering a meeting between Prime Minister David Cameron and the Prime Minister of New Zealand, John Key, claimed that Key was the conservative leader who “is arguably Mr Cameron’s closest… Continue Reading ➤

The Politics of the Politics of European Austerity

German Chancellor Angela Merkel and European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker in May 2014. Has the advent of the latter's European investment plan indicated a shift in the balance of power in Europe away from German austerity?

The situation in Greece is at breaking point. Local councils have no money and Orthodox churches are having to feed people that authorities cannot cope with. Meanwhile in Athens, the newly elected Syriza party are in a standoff with the European Central Bank as they try to restructure their debt. They promised Greek voters they would… Continue Reading ➤

Press ethics and the general election – a losing battle?

Here we go. It’s the 6th of May. One day until the General Election and even as I write this article tucked away in a dark corner of a library there is simply no getting away from it. The topic is everywhere, slipping into casual conversations, overheard in the streets, in coffee shops, it’s on… Continue Reading ➤

What’s Wrong with the Left in Europe?

The Occupy London march on 1st May 2012 to mark International Workers' Day

It comes to something when an article on the left in Europe must start with the success of the far-right, once again, in this tumultuous continent. The dust from the three days of terror in Paris, in which gunmen killed 17 people across the French capital, has barely settled on an uneasy and increasingly polarised… Continue Reading ➤

Days of Dawn and Torment: Iran’s slow revolution

The President of Iran Hassan Rouhani at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, in January 2014

“The Ten Days of Dawn” or “Daheh-ye Fajr” is a phrase used throughout Iran to describe and celebrate the brief period between Ayatollah Khomeini’s return to Iran and the official date of the 1979 Islamic Revolution. Some Iranians, however, have referred to the period as “Daheh-ye Zajr” or “The Ten Days of Torment”.  Two phrases that… Continue Reading ➤

Lone-operator Terrorism: Tackling a Growing Threat

terrorism, Breivik

For 17 years, the USA lived in fear of the “Unabomber”, Theodore Kacynski, who sent package bombs to unsuspecting victims. Over the course of these 17 years, the FBI acquired and analysed 82 million records, 9,000 event photographs and 12,000 event documents, but was unable to bring Kacynski to justice. It was eventually his brother… Continue Reading ➤

Vote for Me! Nigel Farage’s Predilection for Personality over Policy

Final Farage

Hidden among the festivities in the run-up to Christmas was Rozanne Duncan’s expulsion from the United Kingdom Independence Party. Cause for cheer should not be in short supply. The dismissal of the Thanet District Council member came in the wake of highly racist comments caught by a BBC exposé which is due to be aired… Continue Reading ➤

The Rise of the European Left: Syriza and Podemos

A riot policeman during May Day protests in Athens, 2010 (Source: Flickr: Joanna)

Today, the European Union is confronted with a problem that has raised the spectre of an existential crisis. Its failure to counter the 2008 financial crisis has led to economic and social devastation throughout Europe, and with it, a surge in anti-EU sentiment for its harsh doctrine of seemingly endless spending cuts. People are quickly… Continue Reading ➤

Withdrawal Symptoms: The struggle for Aceh ten years after the tsunami

Women soldiers of the Free Aceh Movement (GAM) pose with commander Abdullah Syafei'i in 1999 (Source: Wikimedia Commons)

The first step in any recovery programme is admitting there is a problem. Aceh, Indonesia’s northern, gas rich, conservative province, however, has struggled to do so.  Ironically, these problems were caused by the very solutions created in the aftermath of the Boxing Day tsunami in 2004 to address the three decades of separatist conflict and… Continue Reading ➤

The Success of Russia’s Propaganda: Ukraine’s ‘Banderovtsy’

A protester during the Euromaidan in Kyiv, February 2014. [Source: Ivan Bandura]

Russian President Putin was absent from Tuesday’s official ceremony commemorating the 70th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz-Birkenau by the Red Army’s 322nd Rifle Division, opting instead to attend a local tribute at Moscow’s Jewish Museum and Tolerance Centre amid ever-deepening tensions between Russia and the West. The Kremlin’s delegation at the Polish ceremony was… Continue Reading ➤