Inverting Democracy: Gerrymandering in America

Source: Wikipedia

It might seem a truism to say that voters should choose their representatives, but in the USA gerrymandering has got this precisely the wrong way round. Frank Mascara had served for three decades as an elected official of Washington county, which covers southern Pittsburgh. The last eight of those had been in the House of… Continue Reading ➤

The 2018 Russia World Cup: The Politics of Football

Photo: Wikimedia Commons

On the banks of the river Volga lies Nizhny Novgorod, a 1.2 million people strong city on the borderlands of Siberia. Nizhny, one of the lesser-known host cities for the 2018 Russia World Cup, will host the Three Lions in their match against World Cup minnows Panama on June 24th. The city, formerly named Gorky… Continue Reading ➤

From the darling of the West to accusations of a 30-year dictatorship: Museveni’s persistence in the face of electoral fraud

Photo: Gabriel White

Sceptical Ugandans cite corruption and continually rigged elections as hindrances to the development of the ‘pearl of Africa’ in the months after Dr Kizza Besigye’s latest failed run for presidency. ‘Vote Museveni’ t-shirts, with the President’s faded but smiling face, and the washed out election posters covering any and all available outside spaces provide a… Continue Reading ➤

A New Dawn for an Old Party? Post-election Tanzania

Photo: GCIS South Africa

Despite a lack of change in the ruling party in Tanzania’s recent election, does the election of new blood in the top spot signify the possibility for far greater change than if the opposition had emerged victorious? Just two months into his tenure as President of Tanzania, John Magufuli has begun to implement some of the… Continue Reading ➤

What next for Nigeria?

The Marina on Lagos Island in Nigeria's capital: the developed façade of a society undergoing profound change

Radios across Lagos, Nigeria’s most populous city with a staggering 21 million people, are alive with fiery political debate, catchy political jingles and celebrity endorsements. Election fever has hit the city, and the entire country; albeit over a longer period than first imagined. The election was actually due to take place under the auspices of… Continue Reading ➤

How John Key could win the election for David Cameron

The "smiling assassin" John Key meets then US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton

Last month, buried deep in The Times (page eight or so), was a statement of audacious significance concerning a comparatively insignificant leader. Journalist Tim Montgomerie, covering a meeting between Prime Minister David Cameron and the Prime Minister of New Zealand, John Key, claimed that Key was the conservative leader who “is arguably Mr Cameron’s closest… Continue Reading ➤