Brexit – May’s deal, no deal, or a second referendum? Three perspectives from the Globalist.

Source: Flickr

As the date when we leave the EU draws near, three major positions on how we should handle Brexit have emerged. One is to take the withdrawal agreement Theresa May has hammered out with the EU. Another is to walk away from the negotiating table altogether, and leave the EU without any deal. The third… Continue Reading ➤

What is Alt-Right Culture? From Marinetti to 4chan

Umberto Boccioni, Charge of the Lancers, 1916. Source: Wikimedia Commons

**Content Warning: Discussion of racism and anti-Semitism as well as some mention of terrorism and Nazism** The far right in the United Kingdom grew primarily from Oswald Mosley’s British Union of Fascists of the 1930s which was banned during WW2, but its roots stretch back further. [1] It was also present in the earlier ‘radical right’,… Continue Reading ➤

We were promised Brexit would leave us better off – Theresa May’s deal shows we were lied to.

Source: Flickr

In the 19th century, a web of disputes concerning the relations of two duchies along the border of Denmark and the German Confederation, Schleswig and Holstein, came to epitomise the exhausting complexity of the European political landscape in that era. Lord Palmerston, perhaps Britain’s most famous Foreign Secretary, famously remarked: ‘Only three people have ever… Continue Reading ➤

In conversation with Chris Giles, Economics Editor for the Financial Times: Britain, Brexit and the Budget

May

Following the announcement on Wednesday evening that Mrs. May had finally agreed a draft withdrawal deal, the attention of the nation has been on the response of the Cabinet. Thursday saw the resignation of a number of senior ministers, including the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, Dominic Raab, who claimed that he… Continue Reading ➤

‘Jeremy Corbyn is one of the most crap opposition leaders I can remember in a generation’. The Cambridge Globalist talks to Nick Clegg about Brexit, British politics and the rise of populism.

Source: Wikimedia Commons

The past few years have not been great for Nick Clegg. Once the golden boy of British politics with a 74% approval rating, the former Deputy Prime Minister and leader of the Liberal Democrats was by 2014 one of the least popular political figures in modern British history. Then a year later in 2015 the… Continue Reading ➤

Forget the SNP: what about the DUP?

Peter Robinson at a DUP party conference. The leader of the 4th largest party after the last election may become a key presence in any coalition talks after May 7.

The next general election is less than a month away, and although everyone is as ignorant as each other about what will happen once the country goes to the polls on May 7th, everyone has their own prediction. What will Sturgeon offer? How will the Greens do? What are the chances of a Conservative-UKIP deal?… Continue Reading ➤

Does the deficit really matter?

An anti-austerity march in central London in June 2014

It has become an article of faith among the financial, economic and political commentariat in Britain and Europe that a budget deficit is an important issue, and one that requires urgent redress. In the UK, this partly results from domestic politics. Over the last five years, government rhetoric has argued that deficit reduction through government cuts… Continue Reading ➤

The Lib Dems’ big problem: and how to solve it

A Lib Dem 'Facebook flashmob' in Trafalgar Square before the 2010 election, when Lib Dem fortunes were at their apex. But a failure to articulate a clear message is making this election battle significantly more difficult.

Becoming a Lib Dem was never a fashionable choice. But never in my lifetime has my party been as unpopular as it currently is. Much of the dissatisfaction arises from our decision to join – and, to some extent, our priorities during – a Coalition which our leader always said he was open to considering,… Continue Reading ➤

The Greens: unprincipled and incompetent?

Credit: Ben Waters

“They have fine ideals, they’re just very naïve.” So remarks a resident of Brighton & Hove about the Greens, the party running the local council. Even a cursory glance at how the authority has been managed since 2011 when the Greens took office reveals a great deal to support this view. They doubled parking charges… Continue Reading ➤

Fourth past the post: what 2015 could mean for electoral reform

Credit: Ben Waters

With the general election now six weeks away, the political landscape of the United Kingdom could hardly seem more fractured. Divided between the establishment parties and the surging forces of UKIP, Green and SNP, it is seeming increasingly unlikely that the electorate will provide a clear winner on May 7th. This chaotic state of affairs… Continue Reading ➤