How the US midterms will unfold, Part 2: The Senate

Source: Flickr

Today marks one of the most important elections in modern American history. Trump’s election heralded the ascendancy of a divisive and populist kind of politics which has trampled the norms of American democracy. The outcome of today’s midterm elections could either demonstrate a swift repudiation of Trumpian politics, or rather its enduring appeal. If Trump’s… Continue Reading ➤

Transcontinental Turkey: Where is it heading?

Source: Wikimedia Commons

Relations between Turkey and the West are undeniably fraught. The post-war paradigm of relations has shifted. President Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s increasingly authoritarian rule has brought him into conflict with Western leaders, the debacle of Pastor Brunson indicating a new crisis point with the US, and the jailing of journalists bringing complaints from Germany. These shifting… Continue Reading ➤

The Khashoggi Affair: Political miscalculation, intellectual loss, human tragedy

President Donald Trump speaks with Mohammed bin Salman. 
Source: Wikimedia Commons

As the heavy overcast obscuring the truth behind the disappearance of U.S.-based Saudi Arabian journalist Jamal Khashoggi slowly dissipates, details have emerged of his gruesome, premeditated murder, carried out in his own country’s consulate. 2018 has shown itself to be a deadly year for journalists, with at least seventy killed across the globe – three… Continue Reading ➤

How the US midterms will unfold, Part 1: The House of Representatives

Protest outside Trump Tower; Democrats hope an energised voter base will deliver them control of the House.               

Source: Wikimedia Commons

On November 6th, Americans will go to the polls to pick their representatives for both houses of Congress. All 435 seats in the House of Representatives are up for election, and 35 of the Senate’s 100 seats. Half-way through Donald Trump’s first term, this is the United States’ first chance since the 2016 election to… Continue Reading ➤

Four lessons from Wittgenstein on Trump

The Trump Blimp in Parliament Square
Source: Wikimedia Commons

Lesson 1 – Politics is not science In Remarks on Frazer’s Golden Bough, Wittgenstein critiques anthropologist James George Frazer’s argument that the ritual practices (magic) of ‘primitive cultures’ are an early and ineffective form of ‘modern science’. Instead, Wittgenstein argues that societies use magic for an entirely different purpose to science – they do fundamentally… Continue Reading ➤

North Korea: Understanding the Regime

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Alongside the New Year’s Resolutions written by countless individuals across the globe, it can be argued that notable figures in international politics have also strengthened their resolve to change perspectives and policies in the new year.  For example, Kim Jong Un’s New Years Speech, in which he announced his desire to ‘alleviate the tensions and… Continue Reading ➤

The Globalist meets notorious Republican political strategist Roger Stone

Photo: Philip Koehler

Stone is Mike Pence’s evil twin – distinguished only by his 1960s American-in-Venice attire paired with a hair-piece scorched on with a glue gun. Unlike Pence, however, Stone certainly does not model himself as a paragon of Christian virtue, but rather is a self-proclaimed, modern-day Machiavelli. Speaking to the student press at the Union, he… Continue Reading ➤

Mockingbird: Harper Lee’s expression of American change

Harper Lee in 1962, , two years after Mockingbird was published (Source: Jbarta)

The news that Harper Lee was publishing a second novel was greeted by a roar of ecstasy in the literary world and beyond. The BBC described it as launching a ‘‘trade frenzy’’, while the Bookseller magazine anticipates Go Set a Watchman to be ‘‘as big as it gets for new fiction’’, and was told by… Continue Reading ➤

Days of Dawn and Torment: Iran’s slow revolution

The President of Iran Hassan Rouhani at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, in January 2014

“The Ten Days of Dawn” or “Daheh-ye Fajr” is a phrase used throughout Iran to describe and celebrate the brief period between Ayatollah Khomeini’s return to Iran and the official date of the 1979 Islamic Revolution. Some Iranians, however, have referred to the period as “Daheh-ye Zajr” or “The Ten Days of Torment”.  Two phrases that… Continue Reading ➤

The Egregious Folly of Western Intervention

A Kurdish march to raise awareness of the situation in Kobane in Lausanne, Switzerland, on 2 October 2014

Only fools rush in: this maxim – beautifully lyricized by Elvis Presley among others – is as relevant to the field of foreign policy as it is to love, of which there is, unfortunately, no better proof than Ingram Davidson’s piece ‘Why We Should Intervene in the Middle East’. Davidson argues that Britain should become… Continue Reading ➤